Sunday, November 21, 2010

Folk Sayings, Maxims and Proverbs

"Too Many Cooks Spoil The Broth"

Hi, all!

Well, today, while cooking a turkey for my husband (who really misses leftovers when we eat Thanksgiving dinner at my daughter's house), I worked very hard to finish up all the contract work I had to do, so that I can start working on Christmas presents.  I'm close to being done - just a little bit more to do on a reversible dress, then everything is finished (unfortunately, I need to go to Joann's tomorrow to get a few things to finish the dress - gosh, what a hardship!)

But while I was working today, for some reason I started thinking about all the weird things we say in common speech - like "good Lord willing and the creek don't rise" or "six of one, half a dozen of the other".  Where in the world do these come from?  And have you noticed that they tend to be regional?  Sayings that I grew up with in North Carolina are new to people here in Tennessee; when we lived in Indiana they had a whole different set of maxims.  And don't even think about Arkansas - I heard some of the strangest ones ever there!!

So - here's my question:  what's your favorite saying, or the strangest one you ever heard?  And if you remember, where did you hear it?

I can't wait to see what you have to say!!

Later!

Sarah

PS.  Check out the 100 Quilts for Christmas link on the left side of my blog - this is a fabulous way to give back for Christmas, and I hope everyone will participate!!

13 comments:

  1. When things get busy around here or work...my favourite saying is "Busy as a one legged man in an *butt* kicking contest"... hee hee! :)

    Does that count? :)

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  2. When an unexpected happening happens, especially when we are in a car, we say, "Hold 'er Newt, we're headed for the pea patch!"

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  3. I wonder where the saying "LIttle pitchers have big ears" comes from.????

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  4. My SIL, from Wyoming, introduced us to "till who laid the chunk". We native Oregonians got a big laugh, and also had to ask for an explanation of this!

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  5. Then they moved to Georgia and along with the infamous "you're not from around here are ya?" there was the not so famous "is that your tobaggan?" referring to a hat!

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  6. My grandchildren get the biggest kick out of all the sayings I have. One is 'I'm gonna jerk a knot in your tail'. I got that one from my step-dad.

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  7. I have 2: "God bless his pea pickin' heart", and "As sure as God made green apples..."

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  8. Not so much a phrase, but a very descriptive word which I heard from my great grandmother from Kansas. Cattywumpus. As in that block isn't square, it's cattywumpus. I just think it's fun to say. :-)

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  9. "A whole month of Sundays", "this too shall pass" My mother in law.

    "Better than sliced bread" - many peeps in my life. :)

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  10. Wow! Those are great sayings!! We say, "Home again, home again, jiggedy jig". It comes from my MIL. My oldest daughter changed it when she was 5. We would say, "Home again, home again...". She was supposed to finish it and one day she changed it to "Jiggedy frolic" and it stuck. I wonder where a 5 year old gets the word "frolic"?? Same as this is a fun collection, we should collect cool things kids have said. This same child was never cold, she was "shiverous".

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  11. You are the greatest! Thanks so much for helping spread the word about 100 Quilts!

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  12. My mom was from Louisiana and she popped off some of the most colorful expressions sometimes. When she'd get mad at my dad for smiling at something she didn't think was funny, she'd tell him to , "Quit grinning like a jackass eating saw briars!" Of course, that would crack him up even more (and make her "madder than hops"). When she was really thirsty, she'd say "I'm so dry I could spit cotton." My grandma (her mother) was riding in the car with us past wet and muddy fields in La. and she remarked, "Well, I swan (swear), that field is so wet, it'd bog a buzzard's shadow." Oh, Sarah, I could go on and on...

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  13. My family always says "you've got to break it to eat it" when something does not quite go as planned and we are reminded to look at the bright side. This came from my mom making her first cake as a child for HER grandmother, and the cake stuck to the pan. Mom's grandma said "you've got to break it to eat it" to cheer her up - and we've been using that ever since.

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